Supervising Food Safety Level 3

L3 Supervising Food Safety course books

A face to face, interactive course in a safe, supportive environment where you will have direct contact with a tutor, and where you can ask questions! Meeting the requirements of any EHO (Environmental Health Officer) this is a nationally recognised accredited qualification.

Is this course right for me?

This course is designed for those working in all food businesses at a supervisory level. Legislative changes have placed greater responsibility on supervisors, and so the course covers legal requirements, and good practice and procedures for food safety and hygiene:

Authentic Training DO NOT  deliver this course online! We believe that to get the most from the teacher, and for that teacher to get the most from the students we need to be in the same room.

The qualification is designed for learners who are already at, or wish to progress to higher or supervisory level within a food catering/manufacturing or retail  business.

Topics include ensuring compliance with food safety legislation, the application and monitoring of good hygiene practice, how to implement food safety management procedures and the application and monitoring of good practice regarding contamination, microbiology and temperature control.

The course is delivered over two days but there is a prerequisite that students will have answered the questions posed in the "A Question of" book after reading through the "Supervising Food Safety Level 3" instruction book.  Both of which are supplied by AET as part of the course.

Course Dates

LocationDay & Date

Times

Kirkby

22nd and 23rd November

9.15 – 17.00

You can attend the course at our training rooms in Kirkby or arrange for the course to be delivered at your premises. 

Compliance for Managers and supervisors with responsibility for maintaining food safety management procedures: The food business operator must ensure that those within the business responsible for developing and maintaining food safety management procedures, e.g. HACCP based procedures, are appropriately trained.  Managers and supervisors should receive a more advanced level of training which builds on the subject matter targeted at operative workers, but highlights the specific responsibilities associated with supervising and managing a safe food manufacturing operation. The training should develop an understanding what the principles of effective food safety management procedures are, how they are incorporated into working practices and procedures, what the key processes are and how they are implemented within the business

The learning outcomes for this course are:-

LO1 Understand the requirements for ensuring compliance with food safety legislation

1.1 Identify the importance of implementing food safety management procedures More

o The terms:

-    Food hygiene/safety

-    Food poisoning

-    Food safety hazard

-    Food safety management system

o The main characteristics of food related illness, including the terms:

-    Contamination

-    Cross-contamination

-    Causative agent

-    Food vehicle

-    Incubation/onset time

-    Pathogens

-    Common symptoms 

1.2 Identify the responsibilities of those working in a catering environment in respect of food safety legislation and procedures for compliance

o An awareness of the current food safety legislation requirements affecting food handlers’

and supervisors’ responsibilities, including: More

-    Awareness of requirements for HACCP based procedures

-    Temperature control

-    Contamination

-    Handling practices

-    Personal hygiene

-    Cleaning and disinfection

o  The role of those working in a catering environment in internal and external food safety inspections/audits

o  The role of those working in a catering environment in dealing with food complaints, food poisoning allegations and investigations

The role of those working in a catering environment during a food safety inspection

-    Importance of accompanying enforcement officers

-    The importance of accurate written records

o  The potential consequences of non- compliance or the prosecution of a catering business and awareness of the penalties that can be applied to both food handlers and food business operators for non-compliance with food safety legislation

o Due diligence defence

 

LO2 Understand the application and monitoring of good personal hygiene practice, training and competency

2.1 Identify the process of implementing and maintaining high standards of personal hygiene within a catering operation

o Overview of best practice requirements for personal hygiene of food handlers regarding:

-    Handling practices

-    Protective clothing

-    Fitness to Work, including relevance of the term ‘carrier’

-    Role of those working in a catering environment in securing high standards of personal hygiene

-    Open wounds and first aid dressings

-    Hand washing facilities that should be provided in a catering environment, and how these facilities can be managed and monitored on a day to day basis

-    Common barriers to effective hand washing, how to overcome these to ensure food handlers wash hands effectively at appropriate times and how this can be monitored

-    The importance of implementing and enforcing systems regarding the reporting of illness and infections, promptly and actions to be taken if a food handler poses a threat to the safety of the food, including the terms ‘healthy’ and ‘convalescent’ carrier

2.2 Explain the requirements for induction and ongoing training of staff to ensure competency

o The objectives and benefits of food safety training to ensure competency

o The importance of training records

o How to communicate standards and procedures to staff

o How to assess the competency of staff

LO3 Understand the application and monitoring of good practice to keep work areas clean, hygienic and free from pests

3.1 Identify the process of implementing procedures for cleaning, disinfection and waste disposal

o Definitions of:

-    Cleaning

-    Bactericide

-    Detergent

-    Disinfectant

-    Disinfection

-    Sanitisation

-    Biodegradable

-    Contact time

o The reasons for cleaning

o  How cleaning processes can be effectively supervised, including the use of cleaning schedules

o The steps involved in cleaning and disinfecting or in sanitising

o The importance of using the correct equipment, utensils and chemicals when cleaning

o  Safety precautions that should be considered when storing chemicals and cleaning and disinfecting work areas or equipment

o The hazards associated with poor cleaning

o The difference between ‘clean as you go’ and ‘scheduled cleaning’

o Typical areas in a catering operation that will require cleaning, disinfecting and/or sanitising

o The hazards associated with incorrect waste management

o How to clear and dispose of waste safely

o Identification, segregation and disposal of unfit and spoilt food

o The importance of keeping internal and external waste areas clean

3.2 Outline the actions that need to be taken with regards to pest control

o Common food pests

o The main signs of pest infestations

o Why food pests are a hazard to food safety

o  The role of those working in a catering environment in preventing the access and harbourage for pests and in implementing suitable control measures

o The role of those working in a catering environment in pest management:

-    Action to take in the event of a pest complaint by a customer or a member of staff

-    Importance of liaison with an appropriate pest control contractor

-    Staff training and awareness

-    If they find evidence of a pest infestation

LO4 Understand the application and monitoring of good practice regarding contamination, microbiology and temperature control

4.1 Outline the responsibilities of those working in a catering environment when identifying hazards posed by, and procedures to control, microbiological, chemical, physical and allergenic contamination

o Microbiological hazards posed by

o Raw food

o High-risk foods

o Low-risk foods

o Raw ready-to-eat raw foods

o Sources of contamination hazards

o  The different types of microbes of interest to the food industry, including pathogens, low dose pathogens, spoilage and beneficial

o Correct use, and simple methods of, validating the accuracy of thermometers

o The principal causes of microbiological multiplication and survival

o The principal causes of food safety contamination hazards:

-    Cross-contamination

-    Personal health

-    Handling issues

-    Labelling issues

-    Pests

-    Human factors (including lack of effective supervision)

o How good design can help avoid cross contamination through workflow and layout:

-    The hazards associated with poor design and construction of food premises

-    The meaning of the term ‘linear workflow’ and examples of how this can be achieved

-    The importance of using washing and cleaning facilities and equipment appropriately and the need for good lighting

-    The hazards associated with damaged equipment and surfaces in a food room

-    Role of those working in a catering environment regarding equipment and premises including the action to take if damaged equipment or surfaces are identified in a food room

o  How microbiological contamination and cross-contamination can be controlled throughout the food production process in a catering environment

o  How chemical contamination can be controlled throughout the food production process in a catering environment

o  How physical contamination can be controlled throughout the food production process in a catering environment

o Knowledge of common foods which cause allergic reactions

o Possible symptoms of allergic reactions and actions to take

o  How allergenic contamination can be controlled throughout the food production process in a catering environment

4.2 Explain the importance of, and methods for temperature control within a food catering process

o Factors which influence the multiplication of food poisoning bacteria

o The terms ‘bacterial spore’ and toxin

o  The conditions under which spores and toxins are formed and the consequences these may have for food safety

o The temperatures which support the most rapid multiplication of food poisoning bacteria

o Suitable temperatures and/or timescales for:

-    Thawing

-    Cooking

-    Cooling

-    Reheating

-    Hot and cold holding of food

o  Methods of minimising and preventing bacterial multiplication including the need for good ventilation

o The methods used to destroy food poisoning bacteria in food

LO5 Understand how to implement food safety management procedures

5.1 Outline the process for applying a food safety management system into a food business

o Food safety management systems

o  The importance of identifying hazards, control measures, monitoring actions, corrective actions, verification and documentation at steps in the catering process which are critical to food safety

o  Responsibilities and daily activities of food handlers and supervisors to implement and monitor food safety practice and procedures, including opening and closing checks

o  Role of those working in a catering environment in ensuring appropriate corrective actions for deviations from control points in food production, including supervisory actions to take when performance does not achieve standards and targets

o  The importance of providing feedback to those responsible for the food safety procedures and the types of issues you need to address

o  The importance of up-to-date, accurate documentation and records, and examples of the type of records that may be used in a catering business

5.2 Describe methods for, and the importance of, verifying food safety controls and procedures

o Responsibilities of those working in a catering environment with regards to verification

o Role of an audit/inspection in verification

5.3 Outline the responsibilities of those working in a catering environment when identifying and selecting suitable controls and monitoring, to prevent food safety hazards from purchase to service

o Implementing and monitoring controls to minimise hazards from delivery and unloading

o The importance of clear labelling of food

o  Ensuring and monitoring food storage conditions are suitable and specify the temperatures required for different food

o Why stock rotation procedures are important

o Distinguish between ‘Use By’ and ‘Best Before’ date codes and explain why food past its

code must be disposed of

o  Role of those working in a catering environment in implementing and controls at the stages of thawing, preparation, cooking, cooling, reheating, holding and serving of food